ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

COMPILED BY ZOLTÁN KÁRPÁTI AND ESZTER NAGY

(CSAK ANGOLUL ELÉRHETŐ)


1915

Az Est 1915

[s. n.], ‘Dr. Petrovics Elek és Dr. Meller Simon múzeumigazgatók nyilatkozata [Announcement of Dr. Elek Petrovics and Dr. Simon Meller]’, Az Est (25 November 1915), p. 9

First report on the possible attribution of the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci.

1916

Simon Meller, Leonardo da Vinci lovasábrázolásai és a Ferenczy-gyűjtemény bronzlovasa [The Representations of Horsemen by Leonardo da Vinci and the Bronze Statuette of the Ferenczy Collection], lecture at the Országos Régészeti és Embertani Társulat [Hungarian Society of Archaeology and Anthropology], 20 June 1916

Unpublished lecture only known from contemporary reports. The first presentation of the small bronze as a cast after an original model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument, c. 1506. Cf. Meller 1916 and Meller 1918. Reviews: [s. n.], ‘Lionardo da Vinci szobra a Szépművészeti Muzeumban [The Bronze Statuette by Leonardo da Vinci in the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest]’, Pesti Napló (21 June 1916), p. 8 (attributed to Leonardo) ● [s. n.], ‘Meller Simon előadása a Régészeti Társulatban [Lecture by Simon Meller at the Society of Archaeology]’, Az Ujság (21 June 1916), p. 11 (attributed to Leonardo) ● [s. n.], ‘Képzőművészet [Fine Arts]’, Magyarország (22 June 1916), p. 13 (attributed to Leonardo) ● [s. n.], ‘Vortrag’, Pester Lloyd (23 June 1916), pp. 6–7 ● [L. G.], ‘Lionardo? A Szépművészeti Muzeum kincse – A Ferenczi-hagyaték [Leonardo? The Treasure of the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest – The Bequest of Ferenczy]’, Pesti Napló (25 June 1916), p. 15 (has doubts about the attribution) ● [s. n.], ‘Leonardo da Vinci bronzlovasa a Szépművészeti Múzeumban [The Bronze Statuette by Leonardo da Vinci in the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest]’, Vasárnapi Ujság (2 July 1916), p. 423, repr. ● István Dömötör, ‘Lionardo-szobor a Szépmüvészeti múzeumban [The Statuette by Leonardo in the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest]’, Uj idők 22 (2 July 1916), pp. 31–32, repr. (mentions that Wilhelm von Bode also agrees with Meller’s attribution) ● László Éber, ‘Az Országos Régészeti és Embertani Társulat ülései [Meetings of the Hungarian Society of Archaeology and Anthropology]’, Archeológiai Értesítő 37 (1917), p. 223 (a detailed and official report on the lecture).

Meller 1916

Simon Meller, ‘Die Reiterdarstellungen Leonardo da Vincis und die Budapester Bronzestatuette’, Jahrbuch der Königlich Preussischen Kunstsammlungen 37 (1916), pp. 213–50, figs 13–14, pl. 1–2

The first detailed study of the small bronze. As opposed to Paul Müller-Walde (‘Beiträge zur Kenntnis des Leonardo da Vinci: Ein neues Dokument zur Geschichte des Reiterdenkmals für Francesco Sforza: Das erste Modell Leonardo’s’, Jahrbuch der Königlich Preussischen Kunstsammlungen 18 [1897], pp. 92–135) and Francesco Malaguzzi Valeri (La corte di Lodovico il Moro, la vita privata e l’arte a Milano nella seconda metà del quattrocento, vol. 2, Milan 1915) Meller proposes a new chronology of Leonardo’s drawings for the Sforza and Trivulzio Monuments demonstrating a continuous development of the drawings of horses throughout the master’s œuvre. Based on the close relationship between the composition of the small bronze and drawings associated by Meller with the Trivulzio Monument (Royal Collection, Windsor, RL 12353 and 12328) suggests that the statuette represents the climax of this progress and it was made after an original wax model by Leonardo for the Trivulzio Monument, c. 1506, but not necessarily cast by the master himself. For his slightly extended and well-illustrated version, see Meller 1918. Reviews: Emil Ludwig, ‘Leonardos Abenteuer in Ungarn’, Vossische Zeitung (3 October 1916), p. 2 (extensively discusses the Ferenczy Collection) ● [A. E. S.], ‘Das Denkmal des Trivulzio’, Neue Freie Presse (Morgenblatt) (28 October 1916), pp. 1–4 ● György Bölöni, ‘Unser Leonardo’, Pester Lloyd (17 January 1917), pp. 1–3 (attributed to Leonardo) ● [D], ‘Leonardo da Vinci Szépművészeti Muzeumunkban [Leonardo da Vinci in Our Museum of Fine Arts]’, Budapesti Szemle 169, no. 482 (1917), pp. 311–13 ● John Shapley, ‘Notes’, The Art Bulletin 2, no. 2 (1919), pp. 129–32, esp. 130, fig. 2 (attributed to Leonardo) ● Elenco Verga, in ‘Elenco e Analisi’, Raccolta Vinciana 11 (1922), pp. 131–38 (not by Leonardo).

1917

Baldass 1917

Ludwig von Baldass, ‘Neuerwerbungen des Budapester Museums der Bildenden Künste’, Kunst und Kunsthandwerk 20, nos 11–12 (1917), p. 398, repr.

Only mentions as an original model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument. Cites Meller 1916.

Brinton 1917

Selwyn Brinton, ‘Lettere londinesi: Un romanzo leonardesco nella »Pall Mall Gazette« – Dubbî e diffidenze – Leonardo e i tedeschi – Un altro gesso leonardesco?’, Pagine d’Arte 5 (15 May 1917), p. 105

Refers to an article in the Pall Mall Gazette (not known for us). Has doubts about the attribution to Leonardo da Vinci, but mentions a wax model (modello in gesso [sic]), than in a private collection, representing a horse from his first Florentine period (see Suida 1929a, pp. 65–66, figs 74­–75).

Meller 1917

Simon Meller, Ferenczy István bronzgyűjteményének kiállítása [Exhibition on the Bronze Collection of István Ferenczy], exhibition catalogue, Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 1917, p. 9, no. 11

Check-list with an introduction. Mentions and lists the small bronze as an original model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument, c. 1506–12. Cites Meller 1916. Reviews: Artúr Elek, ‘A Szépművészeti Múzeum Ferenczy-bronzai [Small Bronzes from the Ferenczy Collection in the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest]’, Az Ujság (29 March 1917), p. 4 (suggests that Ferenczy purchased the small bronze at a flea market in Rome) ● György Bölöni, ‘Leonardo és egyebek [Leonardo and Others]’, Világ (1 April 1917), p. 7 ● Gábor Térey, ‘Ausstellungen: Budapest’, Kunstchronik N. F. 28 (1916–17) [6 April 1917], p. 303 ● [s. n.], ‘Kultúra: Ferenczy István bronzgyűjteményének kiállítása [Culture: Exhibition on the Bronze Collection of István Ferenczy]’, Élet (8 April 1917), p. 347, repr. ● [s. n.], ‘Ferenczy István bronz-gyűjteményének kiállítása [Exhibition on the Bronze Collection of István Ferenczy]’, Vasárnapi Ujság (8 April 1917), pp. 220–21, esp. 220, repr.

Tietze-Conrat 1917

Erika Tietze-Conrat, ‘Das Rossdenkmal auf G. M. Crespis «Kindermord»’, Mitteilungen der Gesellschaft für vervielfältigende Kunst 40 (1917), p. 13

The Budapest small bronze or a variant without the rider might have been the source for the monument in the background of Giovanni Maria Crespi’s etching representing the Massacre of the Innocents (actually made by Ludovico Mattioli after Giovanni Maria Crespi, see Bartsch XIX.340.3 and cf. Hekler 1927). Cites Meller 1916.

1918

Meller 1918

Simon Meller, ‘Leonardo da Vinci lovas ábrázolásai és a Szépművészeti Múzeum bronzlovasa [The Representations of Horsemen by Leonardo da Vinci and the Bronze Statuette of the Ferenczy Collection]’, Az Országos Magyar Szépművészeti Múzeum Évkönyvei 1 (1918), pp. 75–134, figs 41–43 and 45

Slightly extended and well-illustrated version of Meller 1916. Reviews: Frigyes [Frederick] Antal, ‘A Szépművészeti Múzeum Évkönyvei’, Huszadik Század 20, no. 40 (1918), pp. 238–39, esp. 239 ● Artúr Elek, ‘A Szépművészeti Múzeum Évkönyve’, Nyugat 12, no. 3 (1919), pp. 218–20, esp. 219 ● Gábor Térey, ‘Jahrbuch des ungarischen Landesmuseums für bildende Künste’, Kunstchronik und Kunstmarkt N. F. 30 (October–March 1918–19), pp. 304–6, esp. 305 ● [s. n.], ‘Az Országos Magyar Szépművészeti Múzeum Évkönyvei’, Századok 55, nos 6–10 (1921), pp. 265–68, esp. 266.

1920

Suida 1920

Wilhelm Suida, ‘Leonardo da Vinci und seine Schule in Mailand, IV’, Monatshefte für Kunstwissenschaft 13 (1920), pp. 279–97, esp. 289

Agrees with Meller 1916 that the Budapest small bronze is a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument.

Tietze-Conrat 1920

Erica Tietze-Conrat, ‘Kleinbronzen’, Die bildenden Künste 3 (1920), pp. 44–51, esp. 49, repr.

Only mentions as a very probable model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument.

1921

Cicerone 1921

[s. n.], ‘Sammlungen: Budapest’, Cicerone 13 (1921), pp. 691–92, esp. 692

Only mentions as a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument.

Kramer 1921

Bianca Kramer, ‘Un bronzo di Leonardo da Vinci’, Emporium 56, no. 323 (1921), pp. 278–88, repr.

Agrees with Meller 1916 and Meller 1918 that the Budapest small bronze is a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument made after 1504.

Malaguzzi Valeri 1921

Francesco Malaguzzi Valeri, ‘Un bronzo di Leonardo’, Il Marzocco 26, no. 4 (1921), p. 23

Refutes Meller 1918 [sic]. Firmly rejects Meller’s new chronology as well as his proposed method of establishing a development of Leonardo’s horse studies. Does not accept the attribution of the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo, rather considers it a production of an unknown sculptor inspired by the master’s drawings.

Schottmüller 1921

Frida Schottmüller, Bronze Statuetten und Geräte, Berlin 1921, pp. 98–99, fig. 71

Only mentions as a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument, after 1506. Cites Meller 1916.

1922

Hoffmann 1922

Edith Hoffmann, ‘Bericht aus dem Museum in Budapest’, Belvedere 2 (1922), pp. 97–101, esp. 98

Only mentions as a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument, c. 1506–12. Cites Meller 1916.

Malaguzzi Valeri 1922

Francesco Malaguzzi Valeri, Leonardo da Vinci e la scultura, Bologna 1922, pp. 57–64, 84–88, 99, figs 64–65

Repeats Malaguzzi Valeri 1921. Refutes MELLER 1918 [sic] and considers the Budapest small bronze as a production of an unknown sculptor inspired by Leonardo’s drawings. Review: Edmund Hildebrandt, ‘Neue Leonardo-Literatur’, Repertorium für Kunstwissenschaft 51 (1930), pp. 256–57 (as Leonardo but not for the Trivulzio Monument; cites Meller 1916).

Piper 1922

Reinhard Piper, Das Tier in der Kunst, Munich 1922, p. 176, fig. 139

Only mentions as a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument. Refers to Meller.

1923

MacLagan 1923

Eric MacLagan, ‘Leonardo as Sculptor’, The Burlington Magazine 43 (1923), pp. 67–69, esp. 67

Article on the relief of the Virgin and Child in the Dibblee Collection, Oxford. Attributes the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci.

1924

Hekler 1924

Antal Hekler, ‘Leonardo és az Antik művészet [Leonardo and the Antique]’, Az Országos Magyar Szépművészeti Múzeum évkönyvei 3 (1921–23) [1924], pp. 32–35, esp. 34, note 1

Only mentions as a work reflecting Leonardo’s concept. Refers to Meller.

1925

Brizio 1925

Anna Maria Brizio, Recension of Schottmüller 1925, L’Arte 28 (1925), p. 134

Rejects the attribution of Meller 1916 on the basis of the anatomical deficiencies of the Budapest small bronze.

Schottmüller 1925

Frida Schottmüller, ‘An Equestrian Statuette of the Renaissance’, Art in America and Elsewhere 13 (1925), pp. 63–72, fig. 1

Discusses the Budapest small bronze attributed to Leonardo da Vinci as a source of a small bronze in a private collection, Dresden, here attributed to Tiziano Aspetti (now in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, BK-NM-13152, see Scholten and Verber 2005 and Sénéchal 2007, no. SR. 68b, attributed to a sixteenth-century sculptor from the circle of Giovanni Francesco Rustici or even to an eighteenth-century French caster). Cites Meller 1916.

Venturi 1925

Adolfo Venturi, ‘Leonardiana’, L' arte: rivista di storia dell'arte medievale e moderna 28 (1925), pp. 137–52, esp. 146

Rejects Meller’s attribution of the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci.

1926

Fónagy 1926

Béla Fónagy, Leonardo da Vinci, in Művészeti Lexikon [Dictionary of Art], László Éber et al. (eds), Budapest 1926, p. 438

Only mentions as a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument.

Rózsaffy 1926

Dezső Rózsaffy, Budapest, in Művészeti Lexikon [Dictionary of Art], László Éber et al. (eds), Budapest 1926, p. 106

Only mentions as Leonardo da Vinci.

Stites 1926

Raymond S. Stites, ‘Leonardo da Vinci Sculptor’, Art Studies, Medieval, Renaissance and Modern 4 (1926), pp. 103–9, esp. 103

Attributes the two terracotta battle groups in the Musée du Louvre, Paris (RF 1535) and in the Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence (469 S, see Sénéchal 2007, nos S. 10 and S. 11 as Giovanni Francesco Rustici) to Leonardo da Vinci. Mentions the Budapest small bronze as reflecting Leonardo’s drawings, but its bad cast does not allow to judge the authorship of the statuette. Cites Meller 1916 and Malaguzzi Valeri 1922.

1927

Dvořák 1927

Max Dvořák, Geschichte der italienischen Kunst im Zeitalter der Renaissance I: Das 14. und 15. Jahrhundert, Johannes Wilde and Karl M. Swoboda (eds), Munich 1927, p. 188, pl. 94

Mentions as a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument.

Genthon 1927

István Genthon, ‘Reneszánsz kisbronzok [Renaissance Small Bronzes]’, A Műgyűjtő 1 (December 1927), p. 93

Only mentions as attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

Hekler 1927

Antal Hekler, Leonardo da Vinci, Budapest 1927, pp. 62–65, pls 20–21

Considers the Budapest small bronze as a later cast inspired by Leonardo da Vinci. Referring to the etching representing the Massacre of the Innocents by Giovanni Maria Crespi (cf. Tietze-Conrat 1917) he doubts that the rider originally belonged to the horse.

Hildebrandt 1927

Edmund Hildebrandt, Leonardo da Vinci: Der Künstler und sein Werk, Berlin 1927, pp. 161–67, figs 109–11 and 115

Probably a later cast after an original model by Leonardo da Vinci. However, it is impossible to decide whether it was intended for the Sforza or the Trivulzio Monument.

Petrovics 1927

Elek Petrovics, ‘Le Musée des Beaux Arts de Budapest’, Mouseion 1 (1927), pp. 30–34, esp. 33

Only mentions as a reproduction after an original work (la reproduction d’une œuvre) by Leonardo da Vinci.

1928

McCurdy 1928

Edward McCurdy, The Mind of Leonardo da Vinci, London, 1928, p. 338

Accepts the attribution of Meller 1916 with some reservations.

Rózsaffy 1928

Dezső Rózsaffy, ‘Une promenade rapide au Musée des Beaux Art’, A Műgyűjtő 2 (August and September 1928), pp. 218–22, esp. 221

Mentions as a later cast after a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Sforza Monument.

Sirén 1928

Osvald Sirén, Léonard de Vinci: L’artiste et l’homme, Paris and Brussels 1928, p. 72

Rejects the attribution to Leonardo da Vinci and considers the statuette as a mid-sixteenth-century work while thinking that the small bronze figure of a cowering warrior in the Museo Poldi Pezzoli, Milan (FC 77/68, on deposit from the Fondazione Mario e Fosca Crespi, first published by Wilhelm von Bode, Italienische Bronzstatuetten der Renaissance, Berlin 1907, vol. 2, p. 15, pl. 132, most recently see Luchs, Sturman, and May 2012) is closer to the master. Cites Meller 1916. Review: Eric MacLagan, ‘Leonardo Problems, Léonard de Vinci by Osvald Sirén’, The Burlington Magazine 54 (1929), p. 277.

1929

Pauli 1929

Gustav Pauli, Leonardo, in Allgemeines Lexikon der Bildenden Künstler, Hans Vollmer (ed.), Leipzig 1929, vol. 23, p. 77

The best Renaissance copy after a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Sforza Monument.

Suida 1929a

William Suida, Leonardo und sein Kreis, Munich 1929, pp. 71–72, fig. 76

Cast after a model by Leonardo da Vinci from his later years and finished by a less talented master. Impossible to link it to any specific commissions.

Suida 1929b

William Suida, ‘Leonardo lovasábrázolásai [The Representation of Horsemen by Leonardo da Vinci]’, Archeológiai Értesítő 43 (1929), p. 182–92

Slightly revises Suida 1929a. Cast after an original model by Leonardo da Vinci. Mentions its variant in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (25.74; it was purchased in 1925 from the collection of Karl Freund; first published by Anny E. Popp, ‘Leonardos Reiterdenkmalprojekte’, Zeitschrift für Bildende Kunst 60 [1926–27], pp. 53–62; recently see http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/195311 as probably nineteenth-century Italian) as an argument for the theory that the Budapest horse and rider did not originally belong together (cf. Hekler 1927). Cites Meller 1916 and Hekler 1924.

1930

Lantos Magazin 1930

[s], ‘Lionardo egyetlen bronzszobra Budapesten van: Két tragikus művészélet s néhány kínos eset fűződik hozzá [The Only Small Bronze by Leonardo is in Budapest: Two Tragic Careers and Some Awkward Affairs]’, Lantos Magazin 2, no. 10 (15 May 1930), pp. 824–26

A brief summary on the history of the acquisition of the Budapest small bronze.

London 1930

Exhibition of Italian Art 1200–1900, exhibition catalogue, Royal Academy of Art, London 1930, p. 444, no. ‘case 958–I’ and reproduced as Leonardo da Vinci in Italian Art: An Illustrated Souvenir of the Exhibition of the Italian Art at Burlington House, London 1930, p. 113

Exhibited as a cast after a sketch by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument. Cites Meller 1916 and Hildebrandt 1927. Reviews: Margaret Helen Longhurst, ‘I – Bronzes: The Italian Exhibition’, The Burlington Magazine 56 (1930), pp. 9–15, esp. 10–15 (attributed to Leonardo; cites Meller 1916) ● Selwyn Brinton, ‘Bronzes in the Round and in Relief at the Italian Exhibition’, Apollo 11 (1930), pp. 290–92, esp. 291, repr. ● Tibor Gerevich, ‘Régi olasz mesterek Londonban [Early Italian Masters in London]’, Magyar Szemle 8 (1930), pp. 347–56, esp. 353 and 355 (attributed to Leonardo) ● Edward McCurdy, ‘Leonardo's Bronze Statuette at Burlington House’, The Burlington Magazine 56 (1930), pp. 140–41, repr. (cast after a wax model by Leonardo for the Sforza Monument; cites Meller 1916 and McCurdy 1928).

Petrovics 1930

Elek Petrovics, Képzőművészeti gyűjteményeink [Collections of Fine Arts in Hungary], in Magyarország történelme, földje, népe, élete, gazdasága, irodalma, művészete Vereckétől napjainkig, vol. 5. Művészet, sport, statisztika, Tibor Gerevich et al. (eds), Budapest [1930], p. 203, repr.

Only mentions as a cast after a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument.

Planiscig 1930

Leo Planiscig, Piccoli bronzi italiani del rinascimento, Milan 1930, p. 24, fig. 199

Not by Leonardo da Vinci, but strongly inspired by his art. Review: Ervin Ybl, ‘Planiscig: Piccoli bronzi italiani del rinascimento’, Magyar Művészet 7 (1931), pp. 309–11, esp. 310.

Stites 1930a

Raymond S. Stites, ‘The Bronzes of Leonardo Da Vinci’, The Art Bulletin 12 (1930), pp. 254–69, esp. 260–65, figs 9–10

Together with its variant in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b) it might be a cast by a pupil after a wax model by Leonardo da Vinci. Cites Meller 1916.

Stites 1930b

Raymond S. Stites, ‘Leonardo da Vinci Sculptor’, Art Studies, Medieval, Renaissance and Modern 8 (1930–31), pp. 289–301, esp. 293

Reconstructs the sculptural œuvre of Leonardo da Vinci based on the two terracotta battle groups in the Musée du Louvre, Paris (RF 1535) and in the Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence (469 S, see Sénéchal 2007, nos S. 10 and S. 11 as Giovanni Francesco Rustici), and some terracotta groups of the Master of the Unruly Children (Victoria and Albert Museum, London and the Bode Museum, Berlin; most recently, see Lorenzo Principi, The Master of the Unruly Children: River God and Bacchus, London 2016). Mentions the Budapest small bronze as a cast after a model by Leonardo da Vinci. Cites Stites 1926 and McCurdy 1928.

Ybl 1930

Ervin Ybl, Toszkána szobrászata a quattrocentóban [Sculpture in Quattrocento Tuscany], Budapest 1930, vol. 2, pp. 460–61, fig. 207

Mentions as a cast after a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument. Cites Meller 1916.

1931

Balniel and Clark 1931

Commemorative Catalogue of the Exhibition of Italian Art Held in the Galleries of the Royal Academy, Burlington House London, January–March 1930, David Lindsay Balniel and Kenneth Clark (eds), London 1931, no. 986, pl. 244

Catalogue of London 1930. Attributes the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci. Mentions its variant in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b). Cites Meller 1916 and McCurdy 1930.

Bodmer 1931

Heinrich Bodmer, Leonardo: Des Meisters Gemälde und Zeichnungen, Stuttgart and Berlin 1931, p. 377, repr.

Considers as a mid-sixteenth-century cast inspired by one of Leonardo’s compositions. Cites Meller 1916. Review: Ludwig Heinrich Heydenreich, ‘Leonardo da Vinci als Klassiker der Kunst’, Kritische Berichte zur kunstgeschichtlichen Literatur 4 (1931–32), pp. 161–79, esp. 162 (only suggests that its classification under ‘Weiterleben von Bildgedanken’ would be more successful than under ‘Kopien und Schulerarbeiten’).

Diehl and Schaeffer 1931

Robert Diehl and Albrecht Schaeffer, Ross und Reiter: Ihre Darstellung in der plastischen Kunst, Leipzig 1931, p. 50, no. 23, fig. 23

Cast after an original wax model by Leonardo da Vinci probably for the Trivulzio Monument, c. 1506.

Hevesy 1931

André de Hevesy, ‘Autour de Léonard de Vinci, œuvres retrouvées – œuvres perdues’, Gazette des Beaux Arts 5 (1931), pp. 103–14, esp. 108–9, repr.

Original cast by Leonardo da Vinci intended as a model for the Trivulzio Monument.

Kémeri 1931

Sándor Kémeri, Visage de Bourdelle, Paris 1931, pp. 49–52, repr.

Conversation between Cléopâtre Bourdelle-Sevastos and Simon Meller, who presents his ideas about the Budapest small bronze (see Meller 1916).

Tietze 1931

Hans Tietze, ‘Der Rahmen von Dürers allerheiligen Bild’, Pantheon 8 (1931), pp. 318–24, esp. 320

Mentions Meller 1916 as a methodological analogy for rejecting the attribution of the frame of the Landauer Altarpiece (Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna) to Albrecht Dürer because of its lower quality. Argues that the attribution of the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci is primarily based on its high quality.

Verga 1931

Ettore Verga, Bibliografia Vinciana: 1493–1930, Bologna 1931, pp. 614–15, no. 2336 on Meller 1916; pp. 618–19, no. 2349 on Brinton 1917; p. 626, no. 2383 on Meller 1918; p. 287, no. 2587 on Malaguzzi Valeri 1921; p. 694, no. 2615 on Malaguzzi Valeri 1922

Considers the attribution disputable, but appreciates Meller’s new chronology of Leonardo’s representations of horses.

1932

Ybl 1932

Ervin Ybl, ‘Olasz bronzszobrocskák [Italian Small Bronzes]’, Magyar Művészet 8 (1932), pp. 336–51, esp. 339–40

The closest statuette related to Leonardo as a model for the Trivulzio Monument, but not cast by the master himself. Cites Meller 1918.

1933

Friis 1933

Hjalmar Friis, Ryttenstatues historie i Europa, Copenhagen 1933, pp. 174 and 184

It was not available for us. According to Balogh 1975, p. 119 it considers the Budapest small bronze as a work by Leonardo da Vinci.

Hekler 1933

Antal Hekler, Budapest als Kunststadt, Küssnacht am Rigi 1933, p. 117, fig. 91

Not by Leonardo da Vinci but reflects his ideas.

Nicodemi 1933

Giorgio Nicodemi, Bronzi minori del rinascimento italiano, Milan, 1933, p. 74

The only statuette that can be attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

1934

Becherucci 1934

Luisa Becherucci, La scultura italiana del Cinquecento, Florence 1934, p. 8, repr.

Probably a bronze model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument.

Jeannerat 1934

Pierre Jeannerat, ‘A Newly Discovered Statuette by Leonardo da Vinci’, Apollo 19 (1934), pp. 312–16, repr.

First publication of a variant of the Budapest horse formerly in the Jeannerat Collection, London. (It was acquired by Pierre Jeannerat at London sale in 1933; sold at Sotheby’s, London, 5 July 1990, lot 106; whereabouts unknown.) Kenneth Clark considers it as a late sixteenth-century cast inspired by a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Battle of Anghiari. According to Jeannerat, it must be an original statuette by Leonardo for the Trivulzio Monument and represents a more developed version of the Budapest small bronze intended for the Sforza Monument. Meller agrees with Jeannerat’s attribution but declares the Budapest small bronze later. Cites Meller 1916, London 1930a, Hildebrandt 1927, and McCurdy 1930.

Möller 1934

Emil Möller, ‘Leonardo e il Verrocchio’, Raccolta Vinciana 14 (1934), p. 3, note 1

As opposed to Meller 1916 agrees with Sirén 1927 (actually Sirén 1928) that the Budapest small bronze seems to be a baroque statuette. Also refers to Wilhelm von Bode, who finally rejected its attribution to Leonardo.

1935

Clark 1935

Kenneth Clark, A Catalogue of the Drawings of Leonardo da Vinci, New York, 1935, p. 23

Discusses the Budapest small bronze under the entry on Leonardo’s drawing in the Royal Collection, Windsor (RL 12328), dated 1503–6. Connects the statuette with the inscription on the use of small wax models for the composition of the Battle of Anghiari and considers it as the most important among the small bronzes inspired by Leonardo’s wax models. Lists some Renaissance small bronzes reflecting ‘Leonardesque originals’. Cites Meller 1916.

Venturi 1935

Adolfo Venturi, Storia dell’arte Italiana X: La scultura del Cinquecento, Parte I, Milan 1935, pp. 58–60, fig. 53

Rejects Meller 1916. Not by Leonardo da Vinci, only inspired by his works.

1936

Balogh 1936

Jolán Balogh, ‘Die alten Bildwerke des Ungarischen Museums der Bildenden Künste’, Magyar Női Szemle 2, no. 7–8 (July–August 1936), p. 10

Only mentions as a small bronze influenced by Leonardo da Vinci.

Csánky 1936

Dénes Csánky, ‘A Szépművészeti Múzeum újonnan rendezett gyűjteményei [The Newly Installed Collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest]’, Magyar Művészet 12 (1936), pp. 240–50, esp. 248

Only mentions as a small bronze inspired by Leonardo da Vinci.

Delogu 1936

Giuseppe Delogu, ‘Arte italiana in Ungheria’, Emporium 42 (April 1936), pp. 171–86, esp. 185, repr.

Only mentions as a unique statuette that can be attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

1937

Balogh 1937

Jolán Balogh, ‘Die alten Bildwerke des Ung. Museums der Bildenden Künste’, Forum 7 (1937), pp. 91–92, esp. 92

Only mentions as a small bronze influenced by Leonardo da Vinci.

Entz 1937

Géza Entz, A magyar műgyűjtés történetének vázlata 1850-ig [Summary of the History of Hungarian Art Collecting until 1850], Budapest 1937, p. 69

Only mentions as a small bronze associated with the Trivulzio Monument.

1938

Knapp 1938

Fritz Knapp, Leonardo da Vinci, Bielefeld and Leipzig 1938, p. 59, repr.

Only reproduces as a model [by Leonardo da Vinci] for the Trivulzio Monument.

1940

Gerevich 1940

Tibor Gerevich, Erdélyi magyar művészet [Hungarian Art in Transylvania], in Erdély, Pál Teleki (ed.), Budapest 1940, p. 151

Only mentions as a bronze model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument in the context of the statue of St George and the Dragon by Martin and George of Kolozsvár (Cluj).

Nicodemi 1940

Giorgio Nicodemi, Leonardo da Vinci, Leipzig 1940, 2nd ed., pp. XX and XLIV, no. 163, repr.

Labels as attributed to Leonardo da Vinci and mentions as a small bronze inspired by Leonardo’s models for the Sforza Monument.

1942

Delogu 1942

Giuseppe Delogu, Italianische Bildhauerei, Zürich 1942, p. 169, repr.

Attributes to Leonardo da Vinci with some reservations and connects with both the Trivulzio Monument and the lost cartoon for the Battle of Anghiari, made c. 1507. Cites Meller 1916 and Anny E. Popp, ‘Leonardo’s Reiterdenkmalprojekte’, Zeitschrift für bildende Kunst 60 (1926–27), pp. 53–62 [does not mention the Budapest small bronze] and refers to Malaguzzi Valeri and Venturi.

1943

Heydenreich 1943

Ludwig H. Heydenreich, Leonardo, Berlin 1943, p. 126, 136–37, fig. 102

Mentions the Budapest small bronze as made after Leonardo’s models or drawings in the early Mannerist period. It proves that Leonardo would have been able to solve the problem of the rearing horse even in monumental scale.

1945

Goldscheider 1945

Ludwig Goldscheider, Leonardo da Vinci, London 1945, 2nd ed., p. 43–44, no. 147, pl. 147

Referring to Leonardo’s note on tiny wax models on a drawing in the Royal Collection, Windsor (RL 12328; cf. Clark 1935), considers the Budapest small bronze as an imitation of a wax model made by the master himself, and attributes it to his workshop, c. 1506–8. Also mentions its variants in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b) and in the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934) as deriving from Leonardo’s idea. Cites Meller 1916, Malaguzzi Valeri 1922, Stites 1926, and Clark 1935.

1948

Müller 1948

Theodor Müller, Leonardo da Vinci: Il cavallo, Berlin 1948, pp. 17–20, figs 1–4

Considers as a Studienmodell cast after an original model by Leonardo da Vinci, which might have been intended for everyday use in the master’s workshop. Also mentions the bronze horse in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b) as a variant and another statuette in the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934) as a later copy.

1952

Clark 1952

Kenneth Clark, Leonardo da Vinci, Cambridge 1952, p. 144

Relates the Budapest small bronze to the use of tiny wax models for the lost cartoon of the Battle of Anghiari (cf. Goldscheider 1945). Horses on some of his studies for the mural and on another sheet in the Royal Collection, Windsor (RL 12331) reflect the same pose and character. The deficiencies of the modelling indicate that the statuette might be an enlarged version of one of Leonardo’s wax models made by a pupil.

Hoogewerff 1952

Godefridus J. Hoogewerff, ‘Leonardo e Raffaello’, Commentari 3 (1952), pp. 173–83, esp. 178–80, fig. 7

Mentions as either an original or a workshop production related to the Trivulzio Monument, which inspired the horseman on Raphael’s Meeting of Pope Leo the Great and Attila in the Stanza di Eliodoro, Vatican.

Lazarev 1952

Viktor Nikitich Lazarev, Leonardo da Vinci, Moscow 1952, pp. 65–68, pl. 27

Reflects Leonardo’s drawings for the Trivulzio Monument, c. 1506–8.

Malraux 1952

André Malraux, Le Musée imaginaire de la sculpture mondiale, Paris 1952, p. 766, fig. 623

Only mentions that the Budapest small bronze was made after a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci for the Adoration of the Magi (Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, WA1855.86).

1953

Salmi 1953

Mario Salmi, L’arte italiana, 3 vols, Florence 1953, vol. 3, p. 686, fig. 1017

Attributes to Leonardo da Vinci with some reservations.

Vipper 1953

Boris R. Vipper, Leonardo i skul’ptura, Moscow 1953, pp. 105–14, repr.

It was not available for us. According to Aggházy 1989, p. 59, note 278 it considers that the Budapest small bronze was made in the workshop of Leonardo da Vinci.

1954

Balogh 1954

Jolán Balogh, ‘La Collection des Sculptures Anciennes Étrangères’, Bulletin du Musée Hongrois des Beaux Arts 4 (1954), pp. 58–62, esp. 58

Only mentions as by a follower of Leonardo da Vinci.

Brugnoli 1954

Maria Vittoria Brugnoli, Documenti, notizie e ipotesi sulla scultura di Leonardo, in Leonardo, Saggi e richerche, Achille Marazza (ed.), Rome 1954, pp. 359–89, esp. 374–75, figs 20 and 21

Summary on Leonardo da Vinci as sculptor. Considers the Budapest horse and rider as the most outstanding example among the surviving small bronzes inspired by Leonardo. Also mentions the cowering warrior in the Museo Poldi Pezzoli, Milan (see Sirén 1928). Cites Meller 1916, Brinton 1917, Malaguzzi Valeri 1921, Malaguzzi Valeri 1922, Brizio 1925, Schotmüller 1925, Hildebrandt 1927, McCurdy 1930, Stites 1930a, Möller 1934, Clark 1935, Venturi 1935, Heydenreich 1943, and Clark 1952.

Heydenreich 1954

Ludwig Heinrich Heydenreich, Leonardo da Vinci, Basel 1954, p. 81, fig. 105

Together with the cowering warrior in the Museo Poldi Pezzoli, Milan (see Sirén 1928) the Budapest small bronze was inspired by designs, drawings or models of Leonardo da Vinci. Terracotta battle groups by Giovanni Francesco Rustici reflect similar concept.

Meller 1954

Péter Meller, Leonardo da Vinci, Budapest 1954, p. 18, fig. 19

Only mentions as reflecting Leonardo’s idea for the Trivulzio Monument and reproduces as attributed to Leonardo. Cites Meller 1918 and Malaguzzi Valeri 1892 [actually Malaguzzi Valeri 1922].

Takács 1954

H[arasztiné] Takács Marianne, The Treasures of the Hungarian Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 1954, pp. 18 and 27, fig. 75

Only mentions as a Leonardesque small bronze. Also lists and reproduces as a work by a disciple [sic] of Leonardo da Vinci, made in the mid-sixteenth century.

1955

Degenhart 1955

Bernhard Degenhart, ‘Dante, Leonardo und Sangallo: Dante-Illustrationen Giulio da Sangallos in ihrem Verhältnis zu Leonardo da Vinci und zu den Figurenzeichnungen der Sangallo’, Römisches Jahrbuch für Kunstgeschichte 7 (1955), pp.101–287, esp. 162, note 104

Only mentions in the context of battle scenes in the discussed incunabulum (Dante Alighieri, Divina Comedia, with the commentary of Cristoforo Landino, Florence 1481), inspired by Leonardo da Vinci. Cites Bodmer 1931.

1956

Balogh 1956a

Jolán Balogh, A Régi Szobor Osztály [Department of Sculptures before 1800], in A Szépművészeti Múzeum 1906–1956 [The Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest, 1906–1956], Gábor Pogány Ö. and Béla Bacher (eds), Budapest 1956, pp. 113–30, esp. 127, fig. 131

Only mentions as a work inspired by Leonardo da Vinci and reproduces as a follower.

Balogh 1956b

Jolán Balogh, A Régi Szoborosztály kiállítása [Exhibition of Sculptures before 1800], guide for the permanent exhibition, Budapest 1956, p. 18, fig. 19

Considers as a work inspired by the equestrian monuments of Leonardo da Vinci and reproduces as a follower.

Delogu 1956

Giuseppe Delogu, Antologia della scultura italiana dall’ XI al XIX secolo, Milan 1956, pp. 189–90, repr.

There is no evidence for the attribution of the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci, it resembles only his drawings. Cites Meller 1916 and Anny E. Popp, ‘Leonardo’s Reiterdenkmalprojekte’, Zeitschrift für bildende Kunst 60 (1926–27), pp. 52–62 [does not mention the Budapest small bronze].

London 1956

Hand-List of the Drawings in the Witt Collection: Courtauld Institute of Art, London 1956, p. 82, no. 4526

Lists a drawing by Parmigianino in the collection of the Courtauld Gallery, London (D.1952.RW.4526) recently attributed to Francesco Salviati, as made after the Budapest small bronze.

Weihrauch 1956

Hans R. Weihrauch (ed.), Die Bildwerke in Bronze und in anderen Metallen des Bayerischen National Museums, 13 vols, Munich 1956, vol. 5, p. 80, under no. 105

Mentions under the entry on a small bronze horse as an example for the use of wax and clay models made in the frame of everyday workshop practice and later cast in bronze. Considers its variant in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b) as a copy after the Budapest statuette. Cites Meller 1916 and Heydenreich 1943.

1957

Baumgart 1957

Fritz Baumgart, Geschichte der Abendländischen Plastik: Von den Anfängen bis zur Gegenwart, Cologne 1957, pp. 144–45, 149, 187, fig. 128

Mentions as a cast after a model by Leonardo da Vinci for the cartoon of the Battle of Anghiari, c. 1503–6.

Nicodemi 1957

Giorgio Nicodemi, Influssi di Leonardo negli scultori della Lombardia, in Storia di Milano, Milan 1957, vol. 7, p. 788

It was not available for us, only listed by Balogh 1975, p. 120 without any comment.

Soós 1957

Gyula Soós, ‘Antichi modelli delle statue equestri di Leonardo da Vinci’, Acta Historiae Artium 4 (1957), pp. 129–34, esp. 129, fig. 2

Mentions the Budapest small bronze as by Leonardo da Vinci and underlines the fact that it was inspired by Antique coins rather than gems. Cites Meller 1918 and Hekler 1924.

1958

Lyka 1958

Károly Lyka, Leonardo da Vinci, Budapest 1958, p. 43, fig. 36

Only mentions as a follower of Leonardo da Vinci. Cites Meller 1918 and Soós 1957.

1959

Eszláry 1959

Éva Eszláry, A Szépművészeti Múzeum [Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest], guide for the permanent exhibitions, Budapest 1959, p. 9

Only mentions as a follower of Leonardo da Vinci.

Goldscheider 1959

Ludwig Goldscheider, Leonardo da Vinci: Life and Work, London 1959, 6th ed., p. 180, pl. 114

Cast by the workshop of Leonardo da Vinci after a wax model by the master himself, c. 1506. Relates its style to a drawing for the Fight for the Standard (Musée du Louvre, Paris, 20.271, now considered as an Italian sixteenth-century copy later reworked by Peter Paul Rubens) and another for the Trivulzio Monument (Royal Collection, Windsor, RL 12355). Links it to Leonardo’s note on his drawing in the same collection (RL 12328, cf. Clark 1935). Also mentions the cowering warrior in the Museo Poldi Pezzoli, Milan (see Sirén 1928) as originally belonging to this or a similar bronze group. Lists some small bronzes related to Leonardo. Cites Meller 1916, Malaguzzi Valeri 1922, Stites 1926, Clark 1935, and Venturi 1935.

1961

Amsterdam 1961

Meesters van het brons der Italiaanse Renaissance, organized by the Art Council of Great Britain, exhibition catalogue, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam 1961, under no. 19

Entry on the bronze horse of the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934). Together with its variant in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b) and the Budapest small bronze they are considered as either by or after Leonardo da Vinci related to his models for the Trivulzio Monument or probably for the Battle of Anghiari. Cites Meller 1916, Jeannerat 1934, Clark 1952, Heydenreich 1954, and Brugnoli 1955 [actually Brugnoli 1954].

London 1961

Italian Bronze Statuettes, organized by the Art Council of Great Britain, exhibition catalogue, Victoria and Albert Museum, London 1961, under no. 20

Same as Amsterdam 1961. Review: Herbert Keutner, ‘Italienische Kleinbronzen’, Kunstchronik 15 (1962), pp. 169–77, esp. 174 (none of the three statuettes is by Leonardo da Vinci; rather made after 1550).

1962

Czobor 1962

Ágnes Czobor, ‘Le Musée des beaux-arts, Budapest / The Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest’, Museum 15 (1962), pp. 227–31, esp. 230

Only mentions as a follower of Leonardo da Vinci.

Florence 1962

Bronzetti italiani dell rinascimento, Filippo Rossi and Luciano Berti (eds), exhibition catalogue, Palazzo Strozzi, Florence 1962, under no. 18

Same as London 1961.

Pühringer-Zwanowetz 1962

Leonore Pühringer-Zwanowetz, ‘Ein Triumphdenkmal aus Elfenbein: Die Reiterstatuetten Kaiser Leopolds I. und König Josephs I. von Matthias Steinl’, Wiener Jahrbuch für Kunstgeschichte 19 (1962), pp. 88–164, esp. 139, fig. 96

Matthias Steinl’s ivory statuettes were influenced by Leonardo’s compositions for horses such as the Budapest small bronze cast after a design by Leonardo. Variants and copies of the Budapest statuette such as the small bronzes in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b) and in the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934) might have been available in seventeenth-century workshops. Cites Meller 1916 and Müller 1948.

1963

Balogh 1963

Jolán Balogh, ‘Italian Sculpture in Budapest’, The New Hungarian Quarterly 4, no. 9 (January–March 1963), pp. 143–49, esp. 148, repr.

Not by Leonardo da Vinci himself, only produced under his influence.

Montagu 1963

Jennifer Montagu, Bronzes, London 1963, p. 15

Considers together with its variant in the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934) as sixteenth-century casts recording a wax model by Leonardo da Vinci.

Müller 1963

Theodor Müller, Leonardo da Vinci: Il cavallo, Stuttgart 1963, pp. 19–21, figs 1–3 and 5

The same as Müller 1948. Cites Meller 1916.

Pope-Hennessy 1963

John Pope-Hennessy, Italian High Renaissance and Baroque Sculpture, London 1963, pp. 98–99, fig. 127

Links the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo’s studies for the Battle of Anghiari, and dates it to 1508 around the time he was working with Giovanni Francesco Rustici.

1964

Barfucci 1964

Enrico Barfucci, Lorenzo dei Medici e la società artistica del suo tempo, Florence 1964, p. 192

Mentions as a copy after a bozzetto by Leonardo da Vinci. Cites Malaguzzi Valeri 1922.

1965

Balogh 1965

Jolán Balogh, A Régi Külföldi Szobrászat Kiállítása [Exhibition of Sculptures before 1800], in Szépművészeti Múzeum, guide for the collection, Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 1965, p. 70, repr.

Only mentions as after designs by Leonardo da Vinci.

Chastel 1965

André Chastel, Le grand atelier d’Italie, Paris 1965, p. 131, fig. 142

Only reproduces as workshop of Leonardo da Vinci.

Müller-Hofstede 1965

Justus Müller-Hofstede, ‘Rubens’ St. Georg und seine früheren Reiterbildnisse’, Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte (1965), pp. 69–112, esp. 73, note 20, fig. 4

In the context of the painting St George Battles the Dragon by Peter Paul Rubens in the Museo nacional del Prado, Madrid (P01644) mentions the Budapest small bronze as a modelletto by Leonardo da Vinci. Cites Meller 1916 and Müller 1963.

1966

Balogh 1966a

Jolán Balogh, ‘Studi sulla Collezione di Sculture del Museo di Belle Arti di Budapest VI’, Acta Historiae Artium 12 (1966), pp. 211–346, esp. 292–93, figs 116 and 119

Considers the Budapest small bronze as a mid-sixteenth-century or later cast after studies by an early sixteenth-century follower of Leonardo da Vinci. Cites [Meller 1916], Goldscheider 1945 [as 1951], Clark 1952, Heydenreich 1954, Balogh 1956a, Balogh 1956b, Delogu 1956, Weihrauch 1950, Goldscheider 1959 [as 1953], London 1961, and Müller 1963.

Balogh 1966b

Jolán Balogh, A Régi Szoborosztály állandó kiállítása: Katalógus / Die Ständige Ausstellung der Abteilung für Skulptur: Katalog, check-list for the permanent exhibition, Budapest 1966, pp. 3, 5, and 22

Lists as by a mid-sixteenth-century follower of Leonardo da Vinci.

Pühringer-Zwanowetz 1966

Leonore Pühringer-Zwanowetz, Matthias Steinl, Vienna and Munich 1966, p. 173, fig. 289

Relates the equestrian statuette of Joseph I by Mathias Steinl (Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, KK 4663) to the Budapest small bronze considered as the prominent source for studying Leonardo’s designs of horses (cf. Pühringer-Zwanowetz 1962).

Radcliffe 1966

Anthony Radcliffe, European Bronze Statuettes, London 1966, pp. 71–73, pl. 44

Cast by a pupil of Leonardo da Vinci, perhaps by Giovanni Francesco Rustici, after a probably scaled-up wax model by the master himself, c. 1503–6. Cites Amsterdam 1961, Schotmüller 1918, Montagu 1963, Planiscig 1930, and Pope-Hennessy 1963.

1967

Haks 1967

Frans Haks, ‘Krijger te paard’, Openbaar Kunstbezit 11 (1967), no. 66, repr.

Compares the small bronze in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam (BK-NM-13152, see Scholten and Verber 2005 and Sénéchal 2007, no. SR. 68b, attributed to a sixteenth-century sculptor from the circle of Giovanni Francesco Rustici or even to an eighteenth-century French caster) to the Budapest small bronze and considers the latter as made probably after a model by Leonardo da Vinci.

Ottino della Chiesa 1967

Angela Ottino della Chiesa, The Complete Paintings of Leonardo da Vinci, London 1967, p. 116, repr.

Among similar small bronzes, the Budapest horse and rider are the most probable, although disputed statuettes attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

Weihrauch 1967

Hans R. Weihrauch, Europäische Bronzestatuetten 15.–18. Jahrhundert, Braunschweig 1967, pp. 46–47, note 40 and pp. 94–95, note 120, figs 38 and 96

Discusses as a possible model by Leonardo da Vinci for the Trivulzio Monument. Also mentions the versions in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b) and in the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934) as possible Baroque casts. Considers the rearing horse in the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, Munich (11/17, see Sénéchal 2007, no. SR. 64, as after Leonardo) as cast after a workshop ‘pattern’. Thinks that Giovanni Francesco Rustici might have been involved in the casting of Leonardo’s small models. Cites Meller 1916, Heydenreich 1943, Heydenreich 1954, and Amsterdam 1961.

1968

Aggházy 1968

Mária Aggházy, Olasz renaissance és barokk kisbronzok a berlini és drezdai Állami Múzeumok és a Szépművészeti Múzeum anyagából [Italian Renaissance and Baroque Small Bronzes from the Staatlichen Kunstsammlungen, Dresden, Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest], check list of the exhibition, Budapest 1968, no. 38

Lists the Budapest small bronze as from the circle of Leonardo da Vinci, cast probably after the master’s model. Cites Meller 1916. Reviews: Mária Aggházy, ‘Italian Renaissance and Baroque Small Bronzes in the Budapest Museum of Fine Arts’, The New Hungarian Quarterly 9 (1968), pp. 175–77, repr. (mentions as a questioned work, but reproduces as after a model by Leonardo da Vinci, also refers to its versions in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York [see Suida 1929b] and in the Jeannerat Collection, London [see Jeannerat 1934] as well as a third one in an English private collection, known only from photograph [see Aggházy 1969]; cites Meller 1916 and Jeannerat 1934) ● Mária Aggházy, ‘Statuettes en bronze / Italian Renaissance and Baroque Bronze Statuettes / Italianische Renaissance- und Barock-Bronze-Statuetten’, Kultur Vienna 1 (1968), p. 68, repr. (as Leonardo da Vinci) ● Clara [Klára] Garas, ‘[Ausstellungen:] Ungarn: Budapest: Italienische Bronzeplastiken im Museum der Bildenden Künste’, Pantheon 26 (1968), pp. 155–56, esp. 156 (as a follower of Leonardo da Vinci).

Clark 1968

Kenneth Clark, The Drawings of Leonardo da Vinci in the Collection of Her Majesty the Queen at Windsor Castle, 2nd ed., 3 vols, London 1968, pp. 27–28, under no. 12328

Same as Clark 1935.

Pedretti 1968

Carlo Pedretti, ‘The Burlington House Cartoon’, The Burlington Magazine 110 (1968), pp. 22–28, esp. 25

Only mentions the Budapest small bronze as a cast by a follower of Leonardo da Vinci based on a wax model by the master himself intended for the Battle of Anghiari. It is also noted that the pose of the horse is closer to many of the sketches for the Battle of Anghiari than to any of his studies for the Trivulzio Monument.

Salas 1968

Xavier de Salas, ‘Poussin and Leonardo’, The Burlington Magazine 110 (1968), pp. 633 and 639, fig. 50

Only mentions as a small bronze by Leonardo da Vinci. The horseman in the foreground of the Meleager and Atalanta Hunting painted by Nicolas Poussin in the Museo nacional del Prado, Madrid (P02320) was inspired by the Budapest horse and rider, which implies that the statuette or one of its versions was in Rome in the possession of a friend of Poussin.

1969

Aggházy 1969 [1972]

Mária Aggházy, Nuovi aspetti di una discussione leonardesca, in Évolution générale et développements régionaux en histoire de l’art (Actes du XXIIe congrès international d’histoire de l’art, Budapest 1969), Gyula Rózsa (ed.), 3 vols, Budapest 1972, vol. 2, pp. 743–46

Identifies the Budapest small bronze with an object in Leone Leoni’s possession mentioned by Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo in the Trattato dell’arte della pittura (Milan, 1584) as ‘rilievo di plastico’ (see Lomazzo-Ciardi 1973–74, p. 154). Interprets ‘rilievo’ as ‘excellent’ as opposed to ‘relief’. Lomazzo’s quotations from Matteo Maria Boiardo, Lodovico Ariosto and Bernardo Tasso are considered to describe the Budapest horse and rider (see ibid., p. 155). On the basis of technical examinations finds that the structure of the horse shown in the X-ray images is similar to Leonardo’s technical sketches for casting on one of his drawings in the Royal Collection, Windsor (RL 12349 recto) and observes that both the horse and rider were made of the same alloy as Leonardo describes. Also mentions its variants in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b), in the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934), and in The Hunt Museum, Limerick (formerly in Dublin, MG 037, see http://www.huntmuseum.com/collection/collection-items/mg-037.aspx as after Leonardo ). Cites Meller 1916, Meller 1918, Jeannerat 1934, Planiscig 1930, and Pedretti 1968.

On the occasion of the international congress, a tightly focused exhibition was organized by Mária Aggházy at the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest between 15 and 20 September 1969, in which the Budapest small bronze was displayed together with its two variants in Limerick and New York. Review: Márta Sárvári, ‘Fatto di sua mano’, Múzsák – Múzeumi Magazin 1 (1970), pp. 14–15.

Spencer 1969 [1972]

John E. Spencer, Sources of Leonardo da Vinci’s Sforza Monument, in Évolution générale et développements régionaux en histoire de l’art (Actes du XXIIe congrès international d’histoire de l’art, Budapest 1969), Gyula Rózsa (ed.) , 3 vols, Budapest 1972, vol. 2, pp. 735–42, esp. p. 735

Mentions the Budapest small bronze as the closest example of the designs by Leonardo da Vinci for the Sforza Monument. Cites Meller 1916, Malaguzzi Valeri 1822, Clark 1935, and Müller 1948.

1970

Avery 1970

Charles Avery, Florentine Renaissance Sculpture, London 1970, p. 148

Mentions Leonardo’s practice of using small wax models for intricate poses of horses intended for the Battle of Anghiari (cf. Clark 1935, Goldscheider 1945, and Clark 1952). Some small bronzes are connected to such models. Does not refer directly to the Budapest small bronze.

Cummings 1970 [1974]

Clare Frederick Cummings, The Bronze Horse and Rider Statuette in the J. B. Speed Art Museum: A Study of Its Relationship to Leonardo and Later Sixteenth Century Italian Artists, and the Examination of Another Bronze Group Possibly by the Same Hand, MA Dissertation, University of Louisville, Louisville (KY) 1970 [published in 1974], pp. 14–16

Mentions the Budapest small bronze as the most faithful reflection of Leonardo’s ideas of equestrian groups. Also refers to its variants in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b), in the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934), and in The Hunt Museum, Limerick (formerly in Dublin, see Aggházy 1969). Cites Meller 1916, Malaguzzi Valeri 1922, Müller 1948, Brugnoli 1954, and Aggházy 1971.

Lyka 1970

Károly Lyka, Leonardo da Vinci, Budapest 1970, p. 22, repr.

Only mentions as workshop of Leonardo da Vinci.

Sáry 1970

Gyula Sáry, ‘Miért Leonardo? [Why is it Leonardo?]’, Művészet 11, no. 7 (1970), pp. 4–6

Comparing it to one of the horses in Michelangelo’s drawing representing the fall of Phaeton, attributes the small bronze to Michelangelo, who might have used it as a model for his drawing. Review: Tibor Hetényi, ‘Miért Michelangelo? [Why is it Michelangelo?]’, Művészet 11, no. 12 (1970), pp. 24–25 (rejects Sáry’s opinion).

Stites 1970

Raymond S. Stites, ‘Un Cavallo di bronzo di Leonardo da Vinci’, Critica d’Arte 17, no. 110 (1970), pp. 13–34, esp. 22, 29, 30–31, figs 23a–b

In the context of a small bronze horse in the Trott Collection here attributed to the young Leonardo da Vinci mentions the Budapest statuette as inspired by Leonardo. Cites Stites 1930a and Clark 1935; also refers to Meller.

1971

1971

Mária Aggházy, ‘La statuette équestre de Léonard de Vinci’, Bulletin du Musée Hongrois des Beaux-Arts 36 (1971), pp. 61–78

See Aggházy 1969. In the literary context of French chivalric culture identifies the rider with Francis I based on physiognomic similarities, appearing in the guise of King Arthur. Proposes that Leonardo made the statuette as a model for a monument commemorating of the victory at Marignano in 1515. Also gives an iconological overview of the dragon helmet with crown. As for its provenance, suggests that the statuette might be identical with the model that Leone Leoni requested from Chancellor Granvella, Bishop of Arras. Its variants in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b) and in the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934) as well as some small bronze warriors in different collections are considered as additional pieces made by Leone Leoni to form a chivalric scene with the Budapest statuette. Gives a report on recent technical examinations, which revealed that the horse and rider is of the same alloy, indicating that they originally belonged together. As opposed to the Budapest statuette, the bronze of the New York horse and another variant in The Hunt Museum, Limerick (formerly in Dublin, see Aggházy 1969) also contain zinc (cf. Sturman, May, and Luchs 2015). Cites Meller 1916, Meller 1918, Planiscig 1930, Clark 1935, Goldscheider 1945 [as 1951], and Pedretti 1968 (on Leone Leoni’s collection).

Aggházy and Eszláry 1971

Mária Aggházy and Éva Eszláry, Abteilung für Alte Skulpturen, in Museum der Bildenden Künste, Budapest 1971, pp. 73–76, esp. 76, repr.

Mentions as Leonardo da Vinci.

Popham 1971

Arthur E. Popham, Catalogue of the Drawings of Parmigianino, 3 vols, New Haven and London 1971, pp. 110–11, under no. 265

As opposed to London 1956 the drawing by Parmigianino in the collection of the Courtauld Gallery, London (D.1952.RW.4526) recently attributed to Francesco Salviati differs from the Budapest statuette in the horse having a rider, and in the tail. Mentions the small bronze horse in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b). Cites Meller 1916.

1972

Aggházy 1972a

Mária Aggházy, ‘Leonardo da Vinci, Francesco I e il bronzetto equestre del Museo di Budapest’, Arte Lombarda 17 (1972), pp. 91–127

See Aggházy 1969 and Aggházy 1971. Discusses the antique sources of the rearing horse. Cites Meller 1916, Meller 1918, Hekler 1924, Clark 1952 [as Clark 1967], Weihbrauch 1967, Clark 1968, and Stites 1970. Review: [s. n.], ‘Livres et travaux, XVIe siècle’, Gazette des Beaux Arts, Supplément: La Chronique des Arts 81 (1973), p. 42.

Aggházy 1972b

Mária Aggházy, Leonardo lovasszobra [Leonardo’s Horse Statuette], Budapest 1972

First monograph on the Budapest small bronze, repeats Aggházy 1968, Aggházy 1969 [1972], Aggházy 1971, and Aggházy 1972a. Her main idea is that the Budapest statuette, made and offered by Leonardo da Vinci to Francis I, represents the French King as King Arthur in the context of a tournament. Cites Meller 1916, Meller 1918, Planiscig 1930, Clark 1952 [as Clark 1967], Heydenreich 1954, Müller 1963, and Clark 1969. Review: Zsuzsa Urbach. ‘G. Aggházy Mária: Leonardo lovasszobra (La statue équestre de Léonard)’, Bulletin du Musée Hongrois des Beaux-Arts 45 (1975), pp. 118–19 (cites Meller 1916, Meller 1918, Aggházy 1969, and Aggházy 1971).

1973

Aggházy 1973

Mária Aggházy, De la statuette équestre de Léonard du Musée des Beaux-Arts de Budapest, in Actas del XXIII. Congreso internacional de historia del arte, Granada 1973, vol. 2, pp. 316–26

See Aggházy 1969, Aggházy 1971, Aggházy 1972a , and Aggházy 1972b. Discusses a possible provenance of the Budapest small bronze from Leonardo da Vinci to Leone Leoni.

Hall 1973

Michael Hall, ‘Reconsiderations of Sculpture by Leonardo da Vinci: A Bronze Statuette in the J. B. Speed Art Museum’, The J. B. Speed Art Museum Bulletin 29 (1973), pp. 7–59, esp. 11–21, figs 6 and 7

Study of a small bronze in the Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky (1949.30.2), here attributed to Leonardo da Vinci, but now considered as Willem Danielsz. van Tetrode. A detailed summary of Leonardo as a sculptor including some previous literature on the Budapest horse and rider. Gives the most extensive criticism of Mária Aggházy’s views. The Budapest horse and rider and its variants in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b), in The Hunt Museum, Limerick (formerly in Dublin, see Aggházy 1969), and in the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934) are considered as distant reflections of Leonardesque ideas rather than made by the master’s own hand. Cites Meller 1916, Brinton 1917, Malaguzzi Valeri 1921, Malaguzzi Valeri 1922, Brizio 1925, Schotmüller 1925, Hildebrandt 1927, McCurdy 1930, Planscig 1930, Stites 1930a, Hevesy 1931, Becherucci 1934, Jeannerat 1934, Möller 1934, Clark 1935, Venturi 1935, Heydenreich 1943, Goldscheider 1945, Clark 1952, Brugnoli 1954, London 1961, Montagu 1963, Clark 1967, Weihrauch 1967, Hetényi 1970, Sáry 1970, Aggházy 1971, and Aggházy 1972a.

Lomazzo and Ciardi 1973–74

Gian Paolo Lomazzo, Scritti sulle arti, Roberto Paolo Ciardi (ed.), 2 vols, Florence 1973–74, vol. 2, p. 155, note 10

Suggests that Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo’s passage ‘[…] un cavallo di rilievo di plastico, fatto di sua mano [di Leonardo], che ha il cavalliere Leone Aretino statovario’ refers to a small model for the Sforza Monument, which could be identified with the Budapest small bronze.

Pedretti 1973

Carlo Pedretti: Leonardo: A Study in Chronology and Style, London 1973, p. 174, fig. 175

Only mentions in the context of Leonardo’s last years as an early sixteenth-century cast similar to a motif on a design for a headpiece of a horse’s armour by a Fontainebleau artist (Staatliche Graphische Sammlung, Munich, 14703). Cites Aggházy 1971.

1975

Balogh 1975

Jolán Balogh, Katalog der ausländischen Bildwerke des Museums der Bildenden Künste in Budapest, Budapest 1975, no. 145

Discusses as a follower of Leonardo da Vinci, inspired by the master’s sketches and lost bozzetti and dates the small bronze to the mid-sixteenth century. Gives a short review of Aggházy 1971. With full bibliography until

  1. Review: John Pope-Hennessy, ‘Italian Sculpture – Budapest and Paris’, Apollo 102 (1975), p. 575, no. 145 (probably mid-sixteenth century cast after a wax model by Leonardo da Vinci).

1977

Aggházy 1977

Mária Aggházy, Italian and Spanish Sculpture, Budapest 1977, no. 30, repr.

Mentions as a statuette by Leonardo da Vinci representing Francis I as King Arthur.

Androssov 1977

Sergej Androssov, in Chudožestvennaja bronza ital’janskogo Vozroždenija: katalog vystavki, Sergej Androssov and Ljubov I. Faenson (eds), exhibition catalogue, The State Hermitage Museum, Leningrad 1977, pp. 24ff, no. 26, figs 13 and 26

It was not available for us, only mentioned by Aggházy 1989, p. 59, note 278.

1978

Bush 1978

Virginia L. Bush, ‘Leonardo’s Sforza Monument and Cinquecento Sculpture’, Arte Lombarda 50 (1978), pp. 47–68, esp. 50, figs 11–13

Considers the Budapest small bronze as the closest to Leonardo’s first version of the Sforza Monument, perhaps even made after one of his sketches in wax or terracotta. Cites Meller 1916, Heydenreich 1954, Aggházy 1972a, and Hall 1973 [Italian version in Marco Castelli, Il gran cavallo di Leonardo da Vinci : mito, storia, attualità, Paderno Dugnano 2012, pp. 61–88].

Eszláry 1978

Éva Eszláry, in Kisplasztikai kiállítás a 10.-től a 19. századig az Iparművészeti Múzeum és a Szépművészeti Múzeum anyagából / Ausstellung von Werken der Kleinplastik 10.–19. Jahrhunderts. Aus dem Besitze des Kunstgewerbemuseums und des Museums der Bildenden Künste in Budapest, Éva Eszláry and Éva Koroknay (eds), exhibition catalogue, Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 1978, p. 8, no. 53, fig. 53

As Leonardo da Vinci. Cites Meller 1916, Balogh 1966a, Aggházy 1969, Aggházy 1971, Aggházy 1972a, Aggházy 1972b, and Balogh 1975.

1979

Androssov 1979a

Sergej Androssov, ‘Bronzovaja statuėtka vsadnika, k voprosam izučenija skul’ptury Leonardo da Vinči’, Iskusstvo 8 (1979), pp. 58–61, repr.

Discusses the small bronze in The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg (2234, first published Androssov 1977, see https://www.hermitagemuseum.org/wps/portal/hermitage/digital-collection/06.+Sculpture/56460) attributed to Leone Leoni as a close version of the rider of the Budapest statuette considered as a work by Leonardo da Vinci with some reservations. Also mentions its variants in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b) and in the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934) as possible copies after the Budapest original. Cites Meller 1916, Stites 1930a, Venturi 1935, Weihrauch 1956, Weihrauch 1967, Stites 1970, Aggházy 1971, Aggházy 1972a, and Balogh 1975.

Androssov 1979b

Sergej Androssov, in Italienische Bronzen der Renaissance: Aus der Sammlung der Staatlichen Ermitage in Leningrad, Sergej Androssov and Ljubov I. Faenson (eds), exhibition catalogue, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Skulpturen-Sammlung, Berlin 1979, pp. 38–40, under no. 24

Considers the rider of the small bronze in The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg (see Androssov 1979) as a copy by Leone Leoni after the Budapest statuette attributed to Leonardo da Vinci. As for the function and iconography of the Budapest small bronze, shares Aggházy’s theory that the rider represents Francis I for whom it was intended. Cites Meller 1916, Aggházy 1971, Aggházy 1972a, and Balogh 1975.

1980

Androssov 1980

Sergej Androssov, ‘Bemerkungen zu Kleinplastiken zweier Ausstellungen’, Acta Historiae Artium 26 (1980), pp. 143–57, esp. 148–49, figs 8–10

Review of the Ausstellung von Werken der Kleinplastik 10.–19. Jahrhunderts. Aus dem Besitze des Kunstgewerbemuseums und des Museums der Bildenden Künste in Budapest (see Eszláry 1978). Attributes the Budapest statuette to Leonardo da Vinci with some reservations and accepts Aggházy’s theory that the rider represents King Francis I. Considers the small bronze in the The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg (see Androssov 1979) as a copy by Leone Leoni after the Budapest rider, which would confirm that the Budapest statuette belonged to Leoni’s collection (cf. Aggházy 1969). Cites Aggházy 1971 and Aggházy 1972a.

Székely, Vayer, and Balás 1980

György Székely, Lajos Vayer, and Edit P. Balás, ‘G. Aggházy Mária: Leonardo utolsó alkotása és az északolasz-francia udvari műveltség 1500 körül című doktori értekezéséről [On the Dissertation by Mária G. Aggházy Titled The Last Work by Leonardo and the Culture in North Italian and French Courts Around 1500]’, Művészettörténeti Értesítő 29 (1980), pp. 99–114

Report on the debate over the doctoral dissertation of Mária Aggházy defended on 12 January 1979. For its edited version, see Aggházy 1989.

1981

Draper 1981

James David Draper, in Profil du Metropolitan Museum of Art de New York: De Ramsès à Picasso, Jacob Bean (ed.), exhibition catalogue, Galerie des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux 1981, under no. 128

Entry on the bronze horse of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b). Considers the Budapest small bronze as a cast inspired by one of Leonardo’s wax models and notes that it is covered by a relatively modern green artificial patina (cf. Sturman, May, and Luchs 2015). Technical details suggest that its versions in New York and in the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934) were not made before the end of the sixteenth century and were probably executed after the Budapest statuette. Both of them are close to the style of Leone Leoni’s Milanese works around

  1. Cites Balogh 1975.

1982

Leithe-Jasper 1986

Manfred Leithe-Jasper, in Renaissance Master Bronzes from the Collection of the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna, Manfred Leithe-Jasper (ed.), exhibition catalogue, National Gallery of Art, Washington DC, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, and Art Institute, Chicago 1986, under no. 39

Entry on the small bronze representing a crouching warrior from the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna (Pl. 5583). Quotes Aggházy’s theory that such statuettes together with the Budapest horse and rider belonged to a representation of a tournament. Cites Planiscig 1930, Weihrauch 1967, Aggházy 1969, Aggházy 1972a, and Hall 1973.

1987

London 1987

Parmigianino: Paintings, Drawings, Prints, exhibition catalogue, Courtauld Institute, London 1987, under no. 5

Mentions the Budapest small bronze attributed to Leonardo da Vinci as a possible model for a drawing by Parmigianino in the collection of the Courtauld Gallery, London (D.1952.RW.4526) recently attributed to Francesco Salviati. Cites London 1956 and Popham 1971.

1989

Aggházy 1989

Mária Aggházy, Leonardo’s Equestrian Statuette, Budapest 1989

Extended summary of her theories already published in Aggházy 1969, Aggházy 1971, Aggházy 1972a, Aggházy 1972b, and Aggházy 1973. Its main idea is that the Budapest statuette, made and offered by Leonardo da Vinci to Francis I, represents the French King as King Arthur in the context of a tournament. Also discusses some previous literature on pp. 55–59. Reviews: Anne Philippart, ‘Aggházy, Mária G.: Leonardo's equestrian statuette’, Revue des archéologues et historiens d'art de Louvain 23 (1990), pp. 195–96 (interesting but not easy to understand) ● Carl Van de Velde, ‘Maria G. Agghàzzy, Leonardo’s Equestrian Statuette, Boedapest, Akademiai Kiado, 1989’, Revue Belge d’Archéologie et d’Histoire de l’Art 60 (1991), p. 127 (considers the author’s argumentation unconvincing).

Pedretti 1989

Carlo Pedretti, ‘Leonardo as a Sculptor: A Bibliography’, Achademia Leonardi Vinci 2 (1989), pp. 131–47

Includes some literature on the Budapest small bronze.

1992

Aggházy and Marani 1992

Mária G. Aggházy and Pietro C. Marani, in Leonardo & Venezia, Giovanna Nepi Sciré and Pietro C. Marani (eds), exhibition catalogue, Palazzo Grassi, Venice 1992, no. 38

Attributes the small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci. For Aggházy’s views, see Aggházy 1989. Marani does not agree with Aggházy that the horseman represents Francis I and links the statuette to the figure of St George fighting with the dragon on a drawing in the Royal Collection, Windsor (RL 12331). The small bronze originates from Leonardo’s studies on the movement of animals from the time of the Battle of Anghiari, but can be dated to Leonardo’s second Milanese period, 1508–13. Cites Meller 1916, Brugnoli 1954, Clark 1968, Aggházy 1972a, Ciardi 1973–74, Pedretti 1973, Aggházy 1977 and Aggházy 1989. Marani also refers to Brinton, Brizio, Heydenreich, Hildebrandt, Malaguzzi Valeri, McCurdy, Möller, Schotmüller, and Venturi.

1994

Eszláry 1994

Éva Szmodisné Eszláry, The Treasures of the Old Sculpture Collection, Budapest 1994, pp. 20–22, fig. 13

Attributes to Leonardo da Vinci and refers to Aggházy’s theory. Cites Aggházy 1989.

1995

Eszláry 1995

Éva Sz. Eszláry, in The Museum of Fine Arts Budapest: Guide, Szilvia Bodnár (ed.), Budapest 1995, no. 183, repr.

Attributes to Leonardo da Vinci and refers to Aggházy’s theory.

1996

Clayton 1996

Martin Clayton, Leonardo da Vinci: A Singular Vision: Drawings from the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle, exhibition catalogue, Buckingham Palace, London 1996, p. 142

Considers the Budapest small bronze as plausibly attributed to Leonardo da Vinci on the basis of its style or at least reflecting an original by him. In the absence of documents on an equestrian monument for Francis I finds Aggházy’s arguments indecisive.

1997

Arasse 1997

Daniel Arasse, Léonard de Vinci, Paris 1997, pp. 241–55, esp. 255, fig. 187

The drawing in the Royal Collection, Windsor (RL 12360 recto) was intended for wax models for small bronzes rather than models for monumental equestrian sculpture. Thinks that although the attribution of the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci is much debated, it reflects his drawings made c. 1504–7 and c. 1517–18. Does not agree with Aggházy 1989 and Aggházy in Aggházy and Marani 1992 that the Budapest statuette is a model for a monument for Francis I appearing as King Arthur.

1998

Weil-Gariss Brandt 1998 [1999]

Kathleen Weil-Garris Brandt, ‘Leonardo e la scultura’, Lettura vinciana 38 (1998), Florence 1999, pp. 31–32

Considers such small bronzes as casts made after wax models in order to preserve them. Links the Budapest statuette to the Sforza Monument on the basis of an engraving in the British Museum, London (1895,0617.182).

2000

Estella Marcos 2000

Margarita Estella Marcos, El mecenazgo de la Reina Maria Hungria en el campo de la escultura, in Carlos V y las artes, Maria José Redondo Cantera and Miguel Angel Zalama Rodríguez (eds), Valladolid 2000, pp. 310–11

It was not available for us. According to Helmstutler Di Dio 2008, p. 261, note 119, associates the Budapest small bronze with the item of the ‘small horse in bronze with its base’ in the inventory of Pompeo Leoni’s house in 1613 (Archivo Histórico de Protocolos, Madrid, Protocolo n. 2661, fol. 625v).

2001

Heller 2001

István Heller, Reiterstatuette nach Entwürfen Leonardo da Vincis, in 46. Kunst-Messe München: 24 November bis 2 December 2001, Munich 2001, pp. 12–17, esp. 12–14, fig. 3–5

Reproduces as a statuette after the designs of Leonardo da Vinci, but writes about it as attributed to Leonardo. Repeats Aggházy’s theory that the rider represents Francis I.

Marani 2001

Pietro C. Marani, ‘Leonardo e gli scultori: Un altro esempio di collaborazione col Rustici?’, Raccolta Vinciana 29 (2001), pp. 103–23, esp. 113–18, fig. 7

Attributes a bronze horse from the private collection of Duchess Arenella in Palermo (now in the private collection of Niscemi Romanov, New York, see Sénéchal 2007, no. SR. 66a) to Giovanni Francesco Rustici and dates it c. 1508–9. Mentions the Budapest horse and rider in connection with a drawing by Leonardo and its inscription of ‘fanne un piccolo di cera lungo un dito’ in the Royal Collection, Windsor (RL 12328) as best reflecting Leonardo’s ideas, but the deficiencies of the modelling raise some doubt about its originality (cf. Clark 1935 and Goldscheider 1945). Thinks that its variant in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b) cannot be linked to the circle of Leonardo or Rustici. Cites Clark 1968 and Aggházy and Marani 1992. [Reprint in Pietro C. Marani, Leonardiana: Studi e saggi su Leonardo da Vinci, Milan 2010, pp. 179­–91.]

2003

Helmstutler Di Dio 2003

Kelley Helmstutler Di Dio, ‘Leone Leoni’s Collection in the Casa Degli Omenoni, Milan: The Inventory of 1609’, The Burlington Magazine 145 (2003), pp. 572–78, esp. 573, note 8

Only mentions that the Budapest small bronze has been identified as a copy of Leonardo’s model for the Sforza Monument and that its provenance from the collection of Leone Leoni has been suggested (cf. Aggházy 1969 and Androssov 1980). Cites Aggházy 1989.

Marani 2003

Pietro C. Marani, ‘Per Leonardo scultore: nuove ipotesi sul bronzo di Budapest, il Monumento Trivulzio e il Rustici’, Arte Lombarda 139 (2003), pp. 154–62

Attributes the Budapest small bronze to Giovanni Francesco Rustici who made it in the 1520s and 1530s after drawings that Leonardo executed in France for the Trivulzio Monument representing the condottiere as St George, c. 1517–18 (cf. Radcliffe 1966). Rejects the relation of the cowering warrior in the Museo Poldi Pezzoli, Milan (see Sirén 1928) and its variants in the Kunsthistorisches Musem, Vienna (see Leithe-Jasper 1986) to the Budapest small bronze. Cites Meller 1916, Brugnoli 1954, Clark 1968, Aggházy 1972a, Aggházy 1973, Pedretti 1973, Aggházy 1989, Aggházy and Marani 1992, and Clayton 1996. Refers to Brinton, Brizio, Brugnoli, Heydenreich, Hildebrandt, Malaguzzi Valeri, McCurdy, Möller, Schotmüller, and Venturi. [Reprint in Pietro C. Marani, Leonardiana: Studi e saggi su Leonardo da Vinci, Milan 2010, pp. 179–90].

Windt 2003

Franzisca Windt, Andrea del Verrocchio und Leonardo da Vinci: Zusammenarbeit in Skulptur und Malerei, Münster 2002, p. 113, note 403 and p. 292, under no. 46

Only mentions among the works previously attributed to Leonardo da Vinci. Cites Aggházy 1972a, Aggházy 1989, and Aggházy and Marani 1992.

2005

Parronchi 2005

Alessandro Parronchi, Proposte per Leonardo scultore, Milan 2005, p. 9, note 6

The most certain among the sculptures attributed to Leonardo da Vinci. Cites Meller 1916 and Aggházy 1989.

Scholten and Verber 2005

Frits Scholten and Monique Verber, From Vulcan’s Forge: Bronzes from the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam 1450–1800, London 2005, under no. 11, note 53

Entry on the small bronze representing a rider on a rearing horse attributed to Giovanni Francesco Rustici in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam (BK-NM-13152; cf. Schottmüller 1925, see Sénéchal 2007, no. SR. 68b). Mentions Giorgio Vasari’s report on how Leonardo da Vinci often gave bozzetti and drawings to his pupils (Giorgio Vasari, Le vite de’ più eccellenti pittori, scultori ed architetti [Florence 1568], Gaetano Milanesi (ed.), 9 vols, Florence 1878–85, vol. 6, pp. 601 and 608), who in turn used them as models for drawings and engravings, as well as sometimes for sculptures like the Budapest small bronze. Cites Malaguzzi Valeri 1922.

2006

Helmstutler Di Dio 2006

Kelley Helmstutler Di Dio, ‘The Chief and Perhaps Only Antiquarian in Spain: Pompeo Leoni and his Collection in Madrid’, Journal of the History of Collections 18 (2006), pp. 137–67, esp. 145, notes 65 and 66, fig. 11

Mentions a bronze statuette representing a ‘pony in the air’ listed in the evaluation of Pompeo Leoni’s house in 1609 (Archivo Histórico de Protocolos, Madrid, 2662, fol. 1378v) and another ‘small horse in bronze with its base’ listed in the inventory of Pompeo Leoni’s house in 1613 (Archivo Histórico de Protocolos, Madrid, Protocolo n. 2661, fol. 625v), which have been associated with the Budapest small bronze attributed to Leonardo da Vinci. Cites Aggházy 1989 and Estella Marcos 2000.

Kárpáti and Szőcs 2006

Zoltán Kárpáti and Miriam Szőcs, in Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest: Masterpieces from the Collection, Andrea Czére et al. (eds), Budapest 2006, p. 41, repr.

Connects the Budapest small bronze with drawings intended for the Battle of Anghiari (esp. Royal Collection, Windsor, RL 12328 and RL 12331) and considers it as cast by a pupil after one of Leonardo’s small wax or clay models.

2007

Bernardoni 2007

Andrea Bernardoni, Leonardo e il monumento equestre a Francesco Sforza: Storia di un’opera mai realizzata, Florence 2007, p. 18, fig. 12

Only mentions the Budapest small bronze in connection with a study of horse legs in the Musée Bonnat-Helleu, Bayonne (1326) as inspired by Leonardo da Vinci.

Recht, Périer-d’leteren, and Griener 2007

Roland Recht, Catheline Périer-d’leteren, and Pascal Griener, in The Grand Atelier: Pathways of Art in Europe (5th–18th centuries), Roland Recht and Catheline Périer-d'leteren (eds), exhibition catalogue, Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels 2007, no. XIII.3, repr.

Attributes the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci considering it as a document of a statue planned for Francis I probably representing him in the guise of King Arthur. As for its provenance, after the death of the king it got into the possession of Giovanni Francesco Rustici, then to Leone Leoni (cf. Aggházy 1969 and Androssov 1980). Cites Bush 1978 and Aggházy 1973.

Sénéchal 2007

Philippe Sénéchal, Giovan Francesco Rustici: 1475–1554: Un sculpteur de la Renaissance entre Florence et Paris, Paris 2007, nos SR 68a–e

Attributes with many reservations the Budapest small bronze to Giovanni Francesco Rustici (cf. Radcliffe 1966 and Marani 2003), and dates it to 1520–50. Considers the bronze horses in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b), and in the Jeannerat Collection, London (see Jeannerat 1934) as later copies. Attributes the horse and rider in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam (see Schottmüller 1925, Scholten and Verber 2005, and Sénéchal 2007, no. SR. 68b) to a sixteenth-century sculptor working in the circle of Giovanni Francesco Rustici or even to an eighteenth-century French caster. Cites Meller 1916, Venturi 1935, Brugnoli 1954, Clark 1968, Balogh 1966a, Aggházy 1972a, Balogh 1975, Aggházy 1989, Aggházy and Marani 1992, Marani 2003, and Helmstutler Di Dio 2006.

2008

Androssov 2008

Sergej Androssov, Museo Statale Ermitage: La scultura italiana dal XIV al XVI secolo, Milan 2008, under no. 93

Considers the horseman of the small bronze from the circle of Leone Leoni in The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg (see Androssov 1979) as a sixteenth-century copy possibly after the Budapest rider attributed to Leonardo da Vinci. Shares the opinion of Aggházy 1971 and Aggházy 1972a that the Budapest horseman represents Francis I. Cites Meller 1916.

Helmstutler Di Dio 2008

Kelly Helmstutler Di Dio, Sculpture in Spanish Collections from Philip II to Philip IV, in Collecting Sculpture in early Modern Europe, Nicholas Penny and Eike D. Schmidt (eds), New Haven and London 2008, pp. 247–77, esp. 261, 266, and 277

See Helmstutler Di Dio 2006. Review: James David Draper, ‘Review of Collecting Sculpture in Early Modern Europe’, The Burlington Magazine 150 (2008), p. 772, note 1 (notes that the referred passage of the inventory of 1609 (fol. 1378v) to the Budapest small bronze has been often claimed to be by Leonardo da Vinci, although no rider is mentioned).

Kárpáti and Szőcs 2008

Zoltán Kárpáti and Miriam Szőcs [mistakenly referred to as Maria Sframeli], in The Splendour of the Medici, Monica Bietti and Annamaria Giusti (eds), exhibition catalogue, Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 2008, no. 89

Connects the Budapest small bronze with drawings for the Battle of Anghiari (esp. Royal Collection, Windsor, RL 12328 and RL 12331) and considers it as made by a pupil after one of Leonardo da Vinci’s small wax or clay models. Based on recent technical examinations carried out by Richard E. Stone, notices James David Draper’s statement that its variant in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b) could not be cast before the end of the eighteenth century (cf. Sturman, May, and Luchs 2015). Cites Meller 1916, CLARK 1967, Clark 1968, Balogh 1975, Aggházy 1989, Aggházy and Marani 1992, Weil-Garris Brandt 1998, Marani 2001, and Helmstutter Di Dio 2006.

2009

Bernardoni 2009a

Andrea Bernardoni, Leonardo and the Equestrian Monument for Francesco Sforza: The Story of an Unrealized Monumental Sculpture, in Leonardo da Vinci and the Art of Sculpture, Gary M. Radke (ed.), New Haven and London 2009, pp. 95–135, esp. 101, plate 43

See Bernardoni 2007.

Bernardoni 2009b

Andrea Bernardoni, A Horse for the King: Probable French Successes of Leonardo’s Casting Techniques, in Leonardo da Vinci and France, Carlo Pedretti (ed.), exhibition catalogue, Château du Clos Lucé, Amboise 2009, pp. 76–82

Considers that the interpretation of the Budapest small bronze as a representation of Francis I in Aggházy 1972a lacks evidence, and finds its attribution to Leonardo da Vinci doubtful. However, tends to agree with Marani 2003. Argues that Rustici planned to use Leonardo’s casting method developed for the Sforza Monument for the equestrian statue of Francis I.

Radke and Stine 2009

Gary M. Radke and Darin J. Stine, An Abiding Obsession: Leonardo’s Equestrian Projects, 1507–1519, in Leonardo da Vinci and the Art of Sculpture, Gary M. Radke (ed.), New Haven and London 2009, pp. 137–59, esp. 153, notes 83–85, plate 43

Considers the Budapest small bronze as cast directly from or closely dependent on a lost wax or clay model that Leonardo da Vinci made for his French equestrian project only preserved in his drawings dated to this period by Clayton 1996. Cites Aggházy 1989 and Kárpáti and Szőcs 2008, also refers to the technical examinations carried out by Shelley Sturman (cf. Sturman, May, and Luchs 2015).

Sénéchal 2009

Philippe Sénéchal, Giovan Francesco Rustici, With and Without Leonardo, in Leonardo da Vinci and the Art of Sculpture, Gary M. Radke (ed.), New Haven and London 2009, pp. 161–93, esp. 175, plate 43

Only mentions the Budapest small bronze as consistent with Rustici’s horses. Cites Marani 2001 and Marani 2003.

Szőcs 2009

Miriam Szőcs, ‘Megméretve, avagy lehet-e a lovas Leonardo alkotása: A Szépművészeti Múzeum kisbronza Washingtonban [Weighed, or Could the Horse and Rider Be Attributed to Leonardo da Vinci: The Small Bronze of the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest in Washington]’, Artmagazin 4 (2009), pp. 74–79

Report on the technical examinations at the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC in 2009 (cf. Sturman, May, and Luchs 2015). Cites Meller 1916, Clark 1968, Radcliffe 1966, and Aggházy 1989.

2010

Butterfield 2010

Andrew Butterfield, ‘Leonardo and Sculpture: Atlanta and Los Angeles’, The Burlington Magazine 152 (2010), pp. 570–71, esp. 571, fig. 74

Exhibition review on Leonardo da Vinci: Hand of Genius at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta (6 October 2009–21 February 2010) and Leonardo da Vinci and the Art of Sculpture: Inspiration and Invention at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (23 March 2010–20 June 2010), see Leonardo da Vinci and the Art of Sculpture, Gary M. Radke (ed.), New Haven and London 2009. Considers the Budapest small bronze as a cast by an early nineteenth-century French manufacture. Also mentions that Martin Kemp expressed his doubts about its attribution to Leonardo at the Leonardo and Sculpture Study Day (High Museum, Atlanta, 6–7 November 2009), because its cocked hooves are not encountered in the master’s surviving drawings for horses (see also Sturman, May, and Luchs 2015, p. 29, note 11).

Marani 2010

Pietro C. Marani, “Non volle Gianfrancesco ... Altri Atorno che Lionardo da Vinci”: Considerazioni su Rustici e Leonardo, in I grandi bronzi del battistero: Giovanfrancesco Rustici e Leonardo, Tommaso Mozzati, Beatrice Paolozzi Strozzi, and Philippe Sénéchal (eds), exhibition catalogue, Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence 2010, pp. 87–105, esp. 101–3, fig. 15

Attributes the Budapest small bronze to Giovanni Francesco Rustici influenced by Leonardo’s inventions, especially his designs for the Trivulzio Monument in the Royal Collection, Windsor (RL 12354 and RL 12355) and the figure of St George fighting the dragon on the drawing of the same collection (RL 12331) dated around 1517–18 (cf. Radcliffe 1966, Marani 2003, Sénéchal 2007, and Bernardoni 2009b). It was probably executed as a model of the equestrian monument for King Francis I commissioned in 1531, or it is one of the small models which Rustici presented to the Florentine cittadini before he left Italy for France in 1528. Refers to the technical examinations at the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC in 2009 and proposes that the rider’s disproportionally smaller size suggests that the Budapest horse and rider may have been separately conceived (cf. Sturman, May, and Luchs 2015). Cites Sénéchal 2007 and refers to the text panels of the chamber exhibition of The Budapest Horse: A Leonardo da Vinci Puzzle held in the National Gallery of Art, Washinton DC, 3 July– 7 September 2009 («www.nga.gov/exhibitions/budapesthorseinfo.shtm»).

Minning 2010

Martina Minning, Giovan Francesco Rustici (1475–1554): Untersuchungen zu Leben und Werk des Florentiner Bildhauers, Münster 2010, p. 14

Only mentions the attribution of the Budapest small bronze to Giovanni Francesco Rustici by Marani 2003. Cites Scholten and Verber 2005.

Szőcs 2010

Miriam Szőcs, in Treasures from Budapest: European Masterpieces from Leonardo to Schiele, David Ekserdjian (ed.), exhibition catalogue, Royal Academy of Arts, London 2010, no. 14

Attributes the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci, see Kárpáti and Szőcs 2008. Cites Aggházy 1989 and Radke and Stine 2009.

2011

Helmsutler Di Dio 2011

Kelley Helmstutler Di Dio, Leone Leoni and the Status of the Artist at the End of the Renaissance, Farnham 2011, p. 212, note 70

Only mentions that Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo’s passage ‘non fu meno eccellente che si fosse nel resto, si come si può vedere fra l’altre cose, da un cavallo di rilievo di plastico, fatto di sua mano [di Leonardo], che ha il cavalliere Leone Aretino statovario’ in the Trattato dell’arte della pittura (see Lomazzo and Ciardi 1973–74, p. 155) has been associated with the Budapest small bronze (cf. Aggházy 1969 and Androssov 1980). Cites Aggházy 1989.

Tüskés 2011

Anna Tüskés, ‘Magyar műgyűjtők, művészettörténészek és műkereskedők levelei Wilhelm von Bodéhoz (Esterházy Miklós, Kulcsár Márton, Meller Simon, Nemes Marcell, Pálffy Móric, Pokorny László és Ráth György) [Correspondances of Hungarian Collectors, Art Historians and Dealers with Wilhelm von Bode]’, Lymbus Magyarságtudományi Forrásközlemények 2011, pp. 417–47, esp. 421–24 and 427

Letters by Simon Meller to Wilhelm von Bode on the newly discovered small bronze attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

Villata 2011

Edoardo Villata, ‘Intorno a Leonardo scultore: Una proposta di metodo e un’ipotesi di applicazione’, Raccolta Vinciana 34 (2011), pp. 53–102, esp. 66–68, fig. 2

Agrees with Suida 1929a that the Budapest small bronze is a cast after a model executed under the supervision of Leonardo da Vinci. Considers that the horse and rider did not originally belong together (cf. Hekler 1927, Suida 1929b, and Sturman, May, and Luchs 2015). Cites Meller 1916, Malaguzzi Valeri 1922, Aggházy 1972b, Aggházy 1977, Aggházy 1989, Milano 1992, Weil-Gariss Brandt 1998 [1999], Marani 2003, Sénéchal 2007, Kárpáti and Szőcs 2008 and Luchs, Sturman, and May 2012 (as under press) and refers to the chamber exhibition of The Budapest Horse: A Leonardo da Vinci Puzzle held at the National Gallery of Art, Washinton DC, 3 July– 7 September 7 2009 (www.nga.gov/exhibitions/budapesthorseinfo.shtm).

2012

Luchs, Sturman, and May 2012

Alison Luchs, Shelley Sturman, and Katherine May, ‘A Statuette from the Workshop of Leonardo da Vinci’, The Burlington Magazine 154 (2012), pp. 768–72, esp. 768, notes 4 and 5

Suggests that the cowering warrior in the Museo Poldi Pezzoli, Milan (see Sirén 1928) is a production of Leonardo’s workshop. Mentions the Budapest horse and rider without any direct proposal. Cites Meller 1916, Balogh 1975, Aggházy 1989, Kárpáti and Szőcs 2008, radke and Stine 2009, Sénéchal 2009, and Butterfield 2010.

2013

Szőcs 2013

Miriam Szőcs, in Masterpieces: Museum of Fine Arts Budapest, Axel Vécsey (ed.), Budapest 2013, p. 56, repr.

Attributes the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci, see Kárpáti and Szőcs 2008.

Villata 2013

Edoardo Villata, Leonardo plasticatore tra Firenze e Milano: Proposte di metodo e di attribuzione, in Terrecotte nel ducato di Milano: Artisti e cantieri del primo Rinascimento, Maria Grazia Ottolenghi and Laura Basso (eds), Atti del convegno, 17–18 ottobre 2011, Milano e Certosa di Pavia, Milan 2013, pp. 271–87

See Villata 2011.

2014

Gosztonyi 2014

Ferenc Gosztonyi, ‘A “Pasteiner-tanszék” vége. Az 1917–1918-as tanszéki pályázat története és iratai [The Demise of the ‘Pasteiner Department’: History and Documents of the Applications for the Chair in 1917–18]’, Művészettörténeti Értesítő 63 (2014), pp. 67–93, esp. 73–77 and 84–85

Publishes and interprets Gyula Pasteiner's preliminary evaluation of the applicants, including Simon Meller for the professorship of the Department of Art History at the Budapest University. Firmly rejects the attribution of Meller 1916.

2015

Bernardoni 2015

Andrea Bernardoni, Leonardo and His Equestrian Monuments: Issues of Casting and Technique, in Leonardo da Vinci 1452–1509: The Design of the Word, Pietro C. Marani and Maria Teresa Fiorio (eds), exhibition catalogue, Palazzo Reale, Milan 2015, pp. 143–53, esp. 148

See Bernardoni 2009b. Agrees with Marani 2003 and refuses Aggházy 1972a. Cites Radke and Stine 2009, Marani 2010, and Sturman, May, and Luchs 2015.

Sturman, May, and Luchs 2015

Shelley Sturman, Katherine May, and Alison Luchs, The Budapest Horse: Beyond the Leonardo da Vinci Question, in Making and Moving Sculpture in Early Modern Italy, Kelley Helmstutler Di Dio (ed.), Aldershot 2015, pp. 25–46, repr.

Detailed report on the technical examinations, including laser scanning for comparing the Budapest small bronze to its variants, carried out at the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC in 2009. The x-ray examination revealed that the Budapest horse and rider were cast indirectly after their model and the x-ray fluorescence analysis proves that its alloy could have been used in the Renaissance. Notes that its green patina is unusual in Renaissance bronzes, which suggests a re-patination in the nineteenth-century (cf. Draper 1981). Its variants in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (see Suida 1929b) and The Hunt Museum, Limerick (see Aggházy 1969) must have been made in the nineteenth century. The New York version seems to derive from the Budapest small bronze, while the Limerick horse possibly originates from a different workshop than either the Budapest or the New York statuettes. Although the Budapest horse and rider were cast at the same time, they might have been made after models from different periods (cf. Hekler 1927, Suida 1929b, and Villata 2011). Concludes that the Budapest small bronze was cast at the beginning of the sixteenth century after a model inspired by Leonardo’s studies of horses. Lists other bronze variants of the Budapest horse and rider. A preliminary summary of the technical examination at http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/Leonardos-Horse.html [not available yet]. Cited Meller 1916, Balogh 1975, Aggházy 1989, Androssov 2008, Helmstutler Di Dio 2008, Kárpáti and Szőcs 2008, Bernardoni 2009, Radke and Stine 2009, Butterfield 2010, Villata 2011, and Sturman, May, and Luchs 2012. Review: Evelyn Welch, ‘Kelley Helmstutler Di Dio, ed. Making and Moving Sculpture in Early Modern Italy’, Renaissance Quarterly 69, no. 4 (2016), pp. 1441–42.

Szőcs 2015a

Miriam Szőcs, in Da Raffaello a Schiele: Capolavori dal Museo di Belle Arti di Budapest, Stefano Zuffi (ed.), exhibition catalogue, Palazzo Reale, Milan 2015, p. 30, repr.

Attributes the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci, see Kárpáti and Szőcs 2008. Cites Aggházy 1989, Radke and Stine 2009, and Szőcs 2015b.

Szőcs 2015b

Miriam Szőcs, in Leonardo da Vinci 1452–1509: The Design of the Word, Pietro C. Marani and Maria Teresa Fiorio (eds), exhibition catalogue, Palazzo Reale, Milan 2015, no. IV.4.5, repr.

Attributes the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci, see Kárpáti and Szőcs 2008. Cites Balogh 1975, Aggházy 1989, Radke and Stine 2009, and Marani 2010.

2016

Markója and Bardoly 2016

Csilla Markója and István Bardoly (eds), ‘Meller Simon és Petrovics Elek levelei Wilde Jánosnak [Correspondance of Simon Meller and Elek Petrovics with Johannes Wilde]’, Enigma 21, no. 84 (2015), pp. 49–68, esp. 49, note 5, p. 53, note 26, p. 56, note 40, p. 57, note 44

Letters by Simon Meller to Joannes Wilde on the newly discovered small bronze attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

Szőcs 2016

Miriam Szőcs, in Chefs-d’œuvre de Budapest: Dürer, Greco, Tiepolo, Manet, Rippl-Rónai, Laurent Salomé and Cécile Maisonneuve (eds), exhibition catalogue, Musée du Luxembourg, Paris 2016, no. 25, repr.

Attributes the Budapest small bronze to Leonardo da Vinci, see Kárpáti and Szőcs 2008. Also refers to recent technical examinations as a confirmation of dating the statuette to the early sixteenth century. Cites Aggházy 1989, Radke and Stine 2009, Szőcs 2015b, and Sturman, May, and Luchs 2015.

Ramharter 2016–17

Johannes Ramharter, in Albrecht Dürer: Come sentirò freddo dopo il sole, Johannes Ramharter and Peter Assmann (eds), exhibition catalogue, Complesso Museale Palazzo Ducale di Mantova, Mantua 2016–17, no. 27, repr.

Considers it as a model for the statue planned for Francis I, but mentions that the attribution to Leonardo da Vinci is debated. Cites Aggházy 1989.

2017

Kárpáti 2017

Zoltán Kárpáti, in Obras maestras de Budapest: Del Renacimiento a las Vanguardias, Mar Borobia and Guillermo Solana (eds), exhibition catalogue, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid 2017, no. 16, repr.

Probably after a lost model by Leonardo da Vinci, with a brief summary on recent scholarship. Cites Meller 1916, Aggházy 1989, and Sturman, May, and Luchs 2015.

2018

Kárpáti 2018a

Zoltán Kárpáti (ed.), Leonardo da Vinci and the Budapest Horse and Rider, with essays by Zoltán Kárpáti, Pietro C. Marani, Andrea Bernardoni, Edoardo Villata, Gary M. Radke, Philippe Sénéchal, Kelley Helmstutler Di Dio, Miriam Szőcs, Alison Luchs, Katherine May, Shelley Sturman, Eszter Sz. Bakonyi, Zoltán Kis, and Eszter Nagy, Budapest 2018, English 232 pp., 129 ills.

The book is laid out in the form of longer essays by international scholars who will cover the variety of point of views and the state of recent scholarship on some aspects of the problems the intriguing small bronze raises.

Kárpáti 2018b

Zoltán Kárpáti, Leonardo da Vinci and the Budapest Horse and Rider: A Brief History of An Attribution, exhibition catalogue, Budapest Museum of Fine Arts 2018, published separately in English and Hungarian, 84 pp., 38 ills.

This publication is issued on the occasion of the exhibition Leonardo da Vinci and the Budapest Horse and Rider on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest, from 31 October 2018 to 6 January 2019.



(The annotated bibliography of the Budapest Horse and Rider is the revised and updated version of Zoltán Kárpáti and Eszter Nagy, ‘The Budapest Small Bronze Associated with Leonardo da Vinci: An Annotated Bibliography’, Bulletin du Musée Hongrois des Beaux-Arts 120–21 (2015–16) [2017], pp. 87–133.)